Sahmayn

Without priority, Quality: c
Without photo
Without infobox
Without redirects
Without references
From wikishia

Sahmayn (Arabic: السَهْمَیْن, lit: the “two shares”) refers to the share of Imam (a) and Sayyids' share in khums.[1] Literally “sahm” means “share” and “benefit”.

Shia jurists believe that khums is divided into two general shares: the share of Imam (a) and the share of Sayyids:

  • Sayyids’ share is given to the mujtahid or with his permission to poor or orphaned Sayyids or a Sayyid who is in travel [with not enough money to go back home].
  • The Imam's share is given to the fully qualified mujtahid during the absence of the Infallible Imam (a) or with his permission to the poor Sayyids, orphaned Sayyid or Sayyids who are left in travel [with not enough money to go back home].

The Imam’s (a) share is delivered to the fully qualified mujtahid during the absence of the Infallible Imam (a) or is consumed in the way he allows.

Al-Shaykh al-Tusi in al-Mabsut, al-Shahid al-Awwal in the al-Lum'a al-Dimashqiyya and al-Shahid al-Thani in Sharh al-lum'at al-Dimashqiyya divided khums into six types based on the verse of khums and considered it an agreed view of Shi'a. Of course, these six shares also go back to two shares; three of the shares, i.e. the share of God, the share of the Prophet (s) and the share of close relatives, are for Imam (a), and the other three shares, i.e. the share of the orphans, the poor and the ones who are left in travel with not enough money to go back home, are for the relatives of the Prophet (s), which is called the share of Sayyids.

The reason for the two division of khums is based on narrations. Imam Musa b. Ja'far (a) explained khums in a narration, and considered a share for the ruler (Imam (a)) and another share for the orphans, the poor and the relatives of the Prophet (s) who are left in travel with not enough money to go back home.

See Also

Notes

  1. Ḥillī, al-Muʿtabar fī sharḥ al-mūkhtaṣar, vol. 1, p. 63.

References

  • The material for this article is mainly taken from سهمین in Farsi WikiShia.