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Umm Umara

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Sahaba
Umm Umara
Personal Information
Full Name Nasiba bt. Ka'b b. 'Amr
Teknonym Umm 'Umara, Umm Habib
Lineage Banu Mazin of Khazraj
Well-Known Relatives Ka'b b. Amr
Muhajir/Ansar Ansar
Place(s) of Residence Medina
Death/Martyrdom after 13/634
Religious Information
Presence at Ghazwas Battle of Uhud and others
Other Activities Participating in Battle of Yamama • transmitting hadith from the Prophet (s)

Nasība bt. Kaʿb (Arabic: نسيبة بنت كعب بن عمرو, d. after 13/634), known as Umm ʿUmāra (Arabic: أمّ عُماره), was one of the female companions of the Prophet (s). In some sources her name is registered as Nusayba.

She was among the first people who converted to Islam in Medina and was one of the two women who converted to Islam in the second treaty of 'Aqaba.

Umm 'Umara participated in some battles and especially the Battle of Uhud to help the injured and fighters. She also accompanied the army of Muslims in other battles and incidents. She narrated hadiths from the Prophet (s).

There is no report about her demise date in the sources, but it can be inferred from a narration that she was alive until the period of the caliphate of 'Umar b. al-Khattab.

Lineage

Her father was Ka'b b. Amr from Banu Mazin, a clan of Khazraj –the famous tribe of Yathrib- and her mother was Rubab bt. 'Abd Allah from the same tribe.[1] So she also was called Nasiba al-Maziniyya. Umm 'Umara must not be confused with another female companion of the Prophet (s) from Ansar named Nusayba bt. Ka'b with the nickname "Umm 'Atiyya".

Umm 'Umara's two brothers, 'Abd Allah and 'Abd al-Rahman b. Ka'b, were also among the companions of the Prophet (s).[2]

Marriage

First she got married to Zayd b. 'Asim from Banu Najjar –a clan of Khazraj- and bore him two children named Habib –that's why she was called Umm Habib too-[3] and 'Abd Allah, who were among the Prophet's companions.[4] After demise of her hasband she, after converting to Islam married Quziyya b. 'Amr from Banu Najjar. She bore him two children named Tamim and Khawla.[5]

Conversion to Islam

She was among the first people who converted to Islam in Medina and it is said that she was one of the two women who converted to Islam in the second treaty of 'Aqaba.[6]

Participation in Battles

Umm 'Umara participated in some battles and especially the Battle of Uhud to help the injured and dress their wounds. When she saw the Prophet (s) in danger, she protected him and received a lot of injuries,[7] therefore the Prophet (s) praised her and then visited her.[8] Although she could not participate in the Battle of Hamra' al-Asad due to her injuries,[9] she accompanied the Muslim's army in other battles and incidents including battles of Khaybar and Hunayn.[10] Umm 'Umara also participated in the Battle of Yamama, which took place in the period of Abu Bakr's caliphate, and lost one of her hands in that battle.[11]

Narration from the Prophet (s)

Umm 'Umara has narrated some hadiths from the Prophet (s).[12]

Demise

There is no report about her demise date in the sources, but it can be inferred from a narration that she was alive until the period of the caliphate of 'Umar b. al-Khattab.[13]

Notes

  1. Ibn Kalbī, Nasab al-muʿid wa Yaman al-kabīr, vol. 2, p. 49; Ibn Hishām, Sīrat al-Nabī, vol. 2, p. 319; Ibn Saʿd, al-Ṭabaqāt al-kabīr, vol. 8, p. 301.
  2. Ibn Kalbī, Nasab al-muʿid wa Yaman al-kabīr, vol. 2, p. 49; Ibn Hishām, Sīrat al-Nabī, vol. 2, p. 319; Ibn Saʿd, al-Ṭabaqāt al-kabīr, vol. 8, p. 301.
  3. Ibn Saʿd, al-Ṭabaqāt al-kabīr, vol. 8, p. 301; Balādhurī, Futūḥ al-buldān, p. 126.
  4. Ibn Kalbī, Nasab al-muʿid wa Yaman al-kabīr, vol. 2, p. 49.
  5. Ibn Saʿd, al-Ṭabaqāt al-kabīr, vol. 8, p. 301; Balādhurī, Ansāb al-ashrāf, vol. 1, p. 251; Ibn Hishām, Sīrat al-Nabī, vol. 2, p. 319.
  6. Ibn Saʿd, al-Ṭabaqāt al-kabīr, vol. 8, p. 301; Balādhurī, Ansāb al-ashrāf, vol. 1, p. 251; Ibn Hishām, Sīrat al-Nabī, vol. 2, p. 319.
  7. Wāqidī, al-Maghāzī, vol. 1, p. 268; Ibn Saʿd, al-Ṭabaqāt al-kabīr, vol. 8, p. 301.
  8. Ibn Saʿd, al-Ṭabaqāt al-kabīr, vol. 8, p. 302-303; Balādhurī, Ansāb al-ashrāf, vol. 1, p. 325-326.
  9. Wāqidī, al-Maghāzī, vol. 1, p. 268, 273; Ibn Saʿd, al-Ṭabaqāt al-kabīr, vol. 8, p. 302.
  10. Wāqidī, al-Maghāzī, vol. 2, p. 573-574; Khalīfa, Kitāb al-ṭabaqāt, vol. 2, p. 880; Ibn ʿAbd al-Barr, al-Istīʿāb, vol. 4, p. 1947; Dhahabī, Siyar aʿlām al-nubalāʾ, vol. 2, p. 278.
  11. Wāqidī, al-Maghāzī, vol. 1, p. 269; Ibn Saʿd, al-Ṭabaqāt al-kabīr, vol. 8, p. 304; Balādhurī, Ansāb al-ashrāf, vol. 1, p. 325; Balādhurī, Futūḥ al-buldān, p. 126; Dhahabī, Siyar aʿlām al-nubalāʾ, vol. 2, p. 281.
  12. Aḥmad b. Ḥanbal. Musnad-i Aḥmad, vol. 6, p. 439; Ibn Māja, Sunan, vol. 1, p. 556; Mizzī, Tuḥfat al-ashrāf, vol. 13, p. 92-93.
  13. Ibn Saʿd, al-Ṭabaqāt al-kabīr, vol. 8, p. 303; Balādhurī, Ansāb al-ashrāf, vol. 1, p. 325-326.

References

  • Aḥmad b. Ḥanbal. Musnad-i Aḥmad. Cairo: 1313 AH.
  • Balādhurī, Aḥmad b. Yaḥyā al-. Ansāb al-ashrāf. Edited by Muḥammad Ḥamīd Allāh. Cairo: Dār al-Maʿārif, 1959 CE.
  • Balādhurī, Aḥmad b. Yaḥyā al-. Futūḥ al-buldān. Edited by ʿAbd Allāh and ʿUmar Anīs al-Ṭibāʿ. Beirut: 1407 AH.
  • Dhahabī, Muḥammad b. al-Aḥmad al-. Siyar aʿlām al-nubalāʾ. Edited by Shuʿayb al-Arnaʾūt. Beirut: 1405 AH.
  • Ibn Kalbī, Hishām b. Muḥammad. Nasab al-muʿid wa Yaman al-kabīr. Edited by Maḥmūd Firdaws al-ʿAzm. Damascus: Dār al-Yaqza ʿArabīyya, 1425 AH.
  • Ibn Saʿd, Muḥammad. Al-Ṭabaqāt al-kabīr. Edited by Broklaman and others. Leiden: 1321 AH.
  • Ibn ʿAbd al-Barr, Yūsuf b. ʿAbd Allāh. Al-Istīʿāb fī maʿrifat al-aṣḥāb. Edited by ʿAlī Muḥammad al-Bajāwī. Cairo: 1380 AH.
  • Ibn Maja, Muḥammad. Sunan. Edited by Muḥammad fuʾād ʿAbd al-Bāqī. Beirut: 1395 AH.
  • Ibn Makūlā, ʿAlī b. Hibatullāh. Al-Ikmāl. Edited by Nayif ʿAbbāsī. Beirut: [n.d].
  • Ibn Hishām, ʿAbd al-Malik. Sīrat al-Nabī. Edited by Muḥammad Muḥyi al-Dīn ʿAbd al-Ḥamīd. Cairo: 1391 AH.
  • Khalīfa b. Khayyāṭ. Kitāb al-ṭabaqāt. Edited by Suhayl Zukār. Damascus: 1966 CE.
  • Mizzī, Yūsuf b. ʿAbd al-Raḥmān al-. Tuḥfat al-ashrāf. Mumbai: 1403 AH.
  • Wāqidī, Muḥammad b. ʿUmar al-. Al-Maghāzī. Edited by Marsden Jones. London: 1996.